What is the place of energy in human life?

The global consumption of energy is rising at an astonishing rate and to sustain this demand, energy producers are relying on increasingly innovative ways of harvesting energy from hydrocarbons, nuclear and renewable resources. As a necessary but precious component for living, the energy that is produced, distributed and consumed raises fundamental questions about what we consider to be right or good.

Applying insights and methods from anthropology and beyond, this multi-disciplinary project seeks to open up a truly novel line of enquiry that takes seriously the importance of ethical sensibility in our energy relationships. Focusing on the events, processes and materials involved, this project positions people as not only central to, but also responsible for our larger energy predicament as we ask: How would we like to sustain human and other life?

Latest news

S.E.A. Book Prize Finalist!

S.E.A. Book Prize Finalist!

We are excited to share the news that Mette M. High’s latest book, Fear and Fortune: Spirit Worlds and Emerging Economies in the Mongolian Gold Rush, published by Cornell University Press has been selected as a Finalist for the 2020 Society for Economic Anthropology Book Prize. The SEA Book Prize Committee looks for the best books in economic anthropology published over the last three years.

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Latest publication

Latest publication

We are excited to announce the publication of “Energy and Ethics?” – a Special Issue of the Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute edited by Mette M. High and Jessica M. Smith.

Latest from the Energy Blog

Is it really renewable, for peat’s sake?

Is it really renewable, for peat’s sake?

by Lydia Cole

During the ‘Energy Debate’ panel hosted on Friday 13 November as part of Energy Ethics 2020, it became clear that the challenges of powering the world on renewable technologies were as palpable as the need to overcome them in order to reduce our reliance on fossil fuels; and reducing this reliance is imperative if we are to limit the impacts of ongoing climate change.

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The Work of Activism

The Work of Activism

by Sarah O’Brien

Supporters and opponents of fossil fuel infrastructures offer different visions of an energy transition – and different insights into what they consider meaningful and desirable work. In this post, I reflect on such concerns around work and employment in the context of resistance to the shale gas industry in the north of England.

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Want to be part of our team?

We are always looking for new talent to join our ever growing team. PhD students and post-doctoral scholars who are keen to base their research activities here are welcome to contact us. Any current opportunities will also be announced here.